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2. Astronomy in antiquity

2. Astronomy in antiquity  

Michael Hoskin

in The History of Astronomy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775727
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803061.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803061
2. Astronomy in antiquity
3. Astronomy in the Middle Ages

3. Astronomy in the Middle Ages  

Michael Hoskin

in The History of Astronomy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775727
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803061.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803061
3. Astronomy in the Middle Ages
The History of Astronomy: A Very Short Introduction

The History of Astronomy: A Very Short Introduction  

Michael Hoskin

Print Publication Year: 
May 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775727
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803061.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780192803061
A Very Short Introduction
2. The architecture of the heavens

2. The architecture of the heavens  

Owen Gingerich

in Copernicus: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2016
Published Online: 
Aug 2016
eISBN: 
9780190605520
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199330966.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199330966
2. The architecture of the heavens In his years at the universities, Copernicus learned three important details about celestial motions that would provide a fundamental foundation for his future astronomical work.
5. Competing with Ptolemy

5. Competing with Ptolemy  

Owen Gingerich

in Copernicus: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2016
Published Online: 
Aug 2016
eISBN: 
9780190605520
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199330966.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199330966
5. Competing with Ptolemy Mathematike syntaxis , meant Mathematical compilation , but the Islamic astronomers called it Almagest —literally “the greatest”—and that was on the title page of the new publication. Copernicus knew the general outline of Ptolemy’s book because a Latin epitome of the work had been published in Venice in 1496. That was the work of Georg Puerbach and Johannes Regiomontanus, two of the outstanding astronomers of the fifteenth century. They had learned Greek for the purpose of translating the Almagest , though in the end what they produced was not a full edition but

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