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10. Can there be objectivity in taste?

10. Can there be objectivity in taste?  

Stephen Gaukroger

in Objectivity: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2012
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191778216
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199606696.003.0010
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199606696
10. Can there be objectivity in taste?
4. Why punish … and how?

4. Why punish … and how?  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
4. Why punish … and how? why punishment is imposed, and we need to justify the penalties we impose in individual cases. Legal justifications for punishment reflect one of two schools of thought.
3. How do we know?Hume’s

3. How do we know?: Hume’s  

Edward Craig

in Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776700
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854216.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192854216
3. How do we know? Of Miracles
4. Dasein

4. Dasein  

Michael Inwood

in Heidegger: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2019
Published Online: 
Jan 2019
eISBN: 
9780191867095
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198828662.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198828662
4. Dasein Philosophers often have reason to place the human being at the centre of their enquiry. An epistemologist who asks ‘What can I know?’ can be expected to discuss the status of the knower. For a phenomenologist such as Husserl, exploring the relationship between, on the one hand, the ‘transcendental’ ego, subject, or consciousness and, on the other, its objects, the human being is central. (Heidegger often criticizes these philosophers for saying too little about the Being of the subject.) But if we are concerned about Being and beings, the human being seems to have no privileged status. It
8. Temporality, transcendence, and freedom

8. Temporality, transcendence, and freedom  

Michael Inwood

in Heidegger: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2019
Published Online: 
Jan 2019
eISBN: 
9780191867095
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198828662.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198828662
8. Temporality, transcendence, and freedom Time has now come into its own. Dasein can only be resolute in time or over time. But we should not say that Dasein is ‘in’ time or ‘over’ time. Time is not a container that Dasein is in, any more than the world is. In fact what is primary is not time ( Zeit ), but Dasein’s timeliness or temporality ( Zeitlichkeit ). This is a standard move in Heidegger: the primary phenomenon is not the world, space, time, or history, but Dasein’s Being-in-the-world, Dasein’s spatiality, Dasein’s temporality, or Dasein’s historicity. What looks like
3. The immorality of an age

3. The immorality of an age  

Patrick Gardiner

in Kierkegaard: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775635
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192802569.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192802569
3. The immorality of an age Kierkegaard's reaction to the developments described in the last chapter was a complex one. As he made abundantly clear in various of his writings, he fully appreciated the devastating objections which Kant had brought against the project of trying to prove by theoretical means the fundamental tenets of Christian orthodoxy. What, on the other hand, seemed to him to be quite unacceptable were the different attempts that had been made to resolve the issues that Kant's critical philosophy had left in its wake. For, in one way or another, these amounted to endeavours to
3. Atheist ethics

3. Atheist ethics  

Julian Baggini

in Atheism: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775925
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192804242.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192804242
3. Atheist ethics
7. Self-determination and the will

7. Self-determination and the will  

Thomas Pink

in Free Will: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2004
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776366
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853585.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853585
7. Self-determination and the will
2. The moral status of animals

2. The moral status of animals  

David DeGrazia

in Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776380
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853608.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853608
2. The moral status of animals
9. Can there be objectivity in ethics?

9. Can there be objectivity in ethics?  

Stephen Gaukroger

in Objectivity: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2012
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191778216
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199606696.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199606696
9. Can there be objectivity in ethics?
3. Desire

3. Desire  

Ronald de Sousa

in Love: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2015
Published Online: 
Jan 2015
eISBN: 
9780191781353
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199663842.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199663842
3. Desire There are two tragedies in life: the first is not to get what you want; the other is to get it. What does the lover want? If there is one thing Diotima got right, it was that love essentially involves desire. But what is desire? And what sorts of desire are characteristic of love?
4. Humanism and morality

4. Humanism and morality  

Stephen Law

in Humanism: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2011
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777363
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199553648.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199553648
4. Humanism and morality
Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction  

Edward Craig

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776700
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854216.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780192854216
A Very Short Introduction
8. Cultural impact

8. Cultural impact  

Jamie A. Davies

in Synthetic Biology: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2018
Published Online: 
Jul 2018
eISBN: 
9780191841699
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198803492.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198803492
8. Cultural impact Science is not an isolated enterprise: it is affected by, and in turn affects, broader society and culture. Synthetic biology has changed aspects of education; has stimulated artists, writers, and film-makers; and has caught the interest of philosophers, ethicists, campaigners, and legislators. This final chapter gives a taste of the wider implications of the technologies described earlier in this book.
1. Hegel's times and life

1. Hegel's times and life  

Peter Singer

in Hegel: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775468
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192801975.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192801975
1. Hegel's times and life Hegel's times Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel was born in Stuttgart in 1770. His father was a minor civil servant at the court of the Duchy of Württemberg. Other relatives were teachers or Lutheran ministers. There is nothing particularly extraordinary to relate about his life, but the times in which he lived were momentous, politically, culturally, and philosophically. In 1789 news of the fall of the Bastille reverberated around Europe. It is of this moment that Wordsworth wrote: Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven! Hegel
2. Heidegger’s philosophy

2. Heidegger’s philosophy  

Michael Inwood

in Heidegger: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2019
Published Online: 
Jan 2019
eISBN: 
9780191867095
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198828662.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198828662
2. Heidegger’s philosophy Heidegger’s admirers differ over whether he produced a second great work, and if so, which it is; the Nietzsche lectures or the Contributions to Philosophy (Of the Event) , drafted between 1936 and 1938, but published only in 1989, as well as other works, are often nominated. But there is general agreement that he wrote one great work, and that it is BT. BT bears comparison with Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit , if not with Plato’s Republic or Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason . It is by far the most
Introductionwhat is critical theory?

Introduction: what is critical theory?  

Stephen Eric Bronner

in Critical Theory: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Oct 2017
Published Online: 
Oct 2017
eISBN: 
9780190692704
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780190692674.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190692674
Introduction what is critical theory? Apology tells how Socrates was condemned by the Athenian citizenry for corrupting the morals of the young and doubting the gods. There was some truth to that complaint. Socrates called conventional wisdom into question. He subjected long-standing beliefs to rational scrutiny and speculated about concerns that projected beyond the existing order. What became known as “critical theory” was built upon this legacy. The new philosophical tendency was generated between World War I and World War II, and its most important representatives would wage an unrelenting assault on the exploitation, repression, and alienation embedded within
8. The great refusal

8. The great refusal  

Stephen Eric Bronner

in Critical Theory: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Oct 2017
Published Online: 
Oct 2017
eISBN: 
9780190692704
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780190692674.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190692674
8. The great refusal Telos and New German Critique began gaining an audience and publicizing its most important representatives. Complicated ideas about alienation, the domination of nature, regression, utopia, and the culture industry made critical theory relevant for young intellectuals who were coming of age amid the turbulence of the times and trying to make sense of what was happening around them. But the rebellion and the solidarity of the young employed the culture industry. That made its radical character no less real. It soon enough became apparent that art is not a lost cause even after
4. Rights and the ‘right to have rights’

4. Rights and the ‘right to have rights’  

Richard Bellamy

in Citizenship: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2008
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775604
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192802538.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192802538
4. Rights and the ‘right to have rights’
Kierkegaard: A Very Short Introduction

Kierkegaard: A Very Short Introduction  

Patrick Gardiner

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775635
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192802569.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780192802569
A Very Short Introduction

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