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Blood: A Very Short Introduction

Blood: A Very Short Introduction  

Chris Cooper

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2016
Published Online: 
Sep 2016
eISBN: 
9780191785467
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199581450.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780199581450
A Very Short Introduction
8. Epilogue

8. Epilogue  

Michael O’Shea

in The Brain: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2005
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776496
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853929.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853929
8.
5. What cells can do

5. What cells can do  

Terence Allen and Graham Cowling

in The Cell: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2011
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777745
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199578757.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199578757
5. What cells can do
7. Cellular therapy

7. Cellular therapy  

Terence Allen and Graham Cowling

in The Cell: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2011
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777745
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199578757.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199578757
7. Cellular therapy
6. Following up people’s health

6. Following up people’s health  

Rodolfo Saracci

in Epidemiology: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2010
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777257
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199543335.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199543335
6. Following up people’s health
7. Circadian rhythms and metabolism

7. Circadian rhythms and metabolism  

Russell G. Foster and Leon Kreitzman

in Circadian Rhythms: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2017
Published Online: 
Mar 2017
eISBN: 
9780191787164
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198717683.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198717683
7. Circadian rhythms and metabolism
8. Side effects, complications, and risks of anaesthesia

8. Side effects, complications, and risks of anaesthesia  

Aidan O’Donnell

in Anaesthesia: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Apr 2012
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777868
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199584543.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199584543
8. Side effects, complications, and risks of anaesthesia
6. Blood transfusion

6. Blood transfusion  

Chris Cooper

in Blood: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2016
Published Online: 
Sep 2016
eISBN: 
9780191785467
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199581450.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199581450
6. Blood transfusion Transfusing animal blood In 1628, Harvey had shown that the blood circulated around the body. Even the harshest sceptics of his theories admitted defeat when Malpighi showed the existence of the capillaries that linked arteries and veins. Yet removing, not adding, blood was still the main medical procedure in the immediate centuries after Harvey. While this seems strange to our modern world-view, it made sense both practically and theoretically to the Renaissance mind. Practically, it is easy to remove blood, at least as long as you know how to close the wound. However, adding blood requires more
1. Medicine at the bedside

1. Medicine at the bedside  

William Bynum

in The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2008
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776984
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199215430.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199215430
1.
1. A history of blood

1. A history of blood  

Chris Cooper

in Blood: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2016
Published Online: 
Sep 2016
eISBN: 
9780191785467
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199581450.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199581450
1. A history of blood Blood as metaphor The Virginians (1857), ‘A choking, dreadful feeling arrested my breath; the ground rocked beneath my feet; a red mist swam before my eyes’ or in Nick Hornby’s Fever Pitch (2002), ‘Shortly before his goal against Newcastle, one of the frequent red mists that plagued him had descended, and he had grabbed a rugged Newcastle defender by the throat and lifted him from the ground’. This is partly physiological—blood flow being redirected to the skin does indeed make you red-faced when you are angry—but also has its roots in the

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