You are looking at  1-20 of 54 items

  • Keywords: constitution x
Clear All

View:

2. The constitution: old and new

2. The constitution: old and new  

Tony Wright

in British Politics: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
May 2013
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191778339
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199661107.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199661107
2. The constitution: old and new
2. Law and African American slavery

2. Law and African American slavery  

G. Edward White

in American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2013
Published Online: 
Dec 2013
eISBN: 
9780199375240
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199766000.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199766000
2. Law and African American slavery
5. Criminal law

5. Criminal law  

G. Edward White

in American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2013
Published Online: 
Dec 2013
eISBN: 
9780199375240
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199766000.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199766000
5. Criminal law
8. Security

8. Security  

David J. Bodenhamer

in The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195378320
8. Security
3. Party organizations: What do they look like? What do they do?

3. Party organizations: What do they look like? What do they do?  

L. Sandy Maisel

in American Political Parties and Elections: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2016
Published Online: 
Jul 2016
eISBN: 
9780190458195
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780190458164.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190458164
3. Party organizations: What do they look like? What do they do? According to his eulogist, longtime New York state senator George Washington Plunkitt, one of the leaders of New York’s Tammany Hall political machine at the turn of the twentieth century, “understood that in politics honesty doesn’t matter, efficiency doesn’t matter, progressive vision doesn’t matter. What does matter is the chance for a better job, a better price of wheat, better business conditions.” At its height the machine controlled more than 12,000 jobs, with an annual payroll of over $12 million, more than leading iron and steel corporations of
The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction  

David J. Bodenhamer

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780195378320
A Very Short Introduction
4. Property

4. Property  

David J. Bodenhamer

in The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195378320
4. Property
EpilogueThe future Constitution

Epilogue: The future Constitution  

David J. Bodenhamer

in The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195378320
Epilogue
5. Representation

5. Representation  

David J. Bodenhamer

in The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195378320
5. Representation
1. The revolutionary Constitution

1. The revolutionary Constitution  

David J. Bodenhamer

in The U.S. Constitution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780190865689
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780195378320.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195378320
1. The revolutionary Constitution
3. Giving and taking offence

3. Giving and taking offence  

Nigel Warburton

in Free Speech: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2009
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777080
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199232352.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199232352
3. Giving and taking offence
Introduction

Introduction  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
Introduction The Founding Fathers who drafted the U.S. Constitution in 1787 feared political parties, popular democracy, and centralized government. Contrary to these sentiments, the national politics that emerged has been that of intense partisan conflict, the continual expansion of suffrage, and the expansion of federal power. Early on, American politics became a blood sport with political candidates and officeholders assailing opponents in negative, and often, vicious ways, to win votes within an electorate that had increased in size and expressed a multitude of interests. By the 1830s all politicians, whatever their party affiliation, proclaimed themselves democrats and “men of the
9. Tumultuous politics continued, 1974–present

9. Tumultuous politics continued, 1974–present  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0010
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
9. Tumultuous politics continued, 1974–present Five salient factors shaped the context for post–Cold War politics: the demise of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, booms and busts in the economy, increased polarization within the electorate, the continuation of low voter turnout, and the emergence of grassroots activist organizations not necessarily loyal to any political party. Given the large size of government and the growing importance of television, the presidency gained visibility and preeminence as Congress receded in political significance. Party competition remained intense, with both parties incorporating grassroots activist wings that encouraged leaders to take polarized positions.
1. The politics of the Constitution, 1787–89

1. The politics of the Constitution, 1787–89  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
1. The politics of the Constitution, 1787–89 The delegates who gathered in Philadelphia in late May 1787 shared a common belief that what they were about to undertake—the drafting of a new constitution for the nation—was of historic importance. Riding on their shoulders rested the future of their country and the destiny of the world. Failure meant chaos and perhaps the return of oppressive, corrupt, and authoritarian government serving the privileged and oppressing the masses. They agreed that good government needed to protect liberty, property, and individual rights, although exactly what these terms meant remained open for debate. Influenced by
2. Contentious people and factious parties in the Early Republic, 1789–1824

2. Contentious people and factious parties in the Early Republic, 1789–1824  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
2. Contentious people and factious parties in the Early Republic, 1789–1824 The Founding Fathers feared political factions as a natural corruption of democrat government. None envisioned the rise of the severe factionalism that arose during Washington’s administration from 1789 to 1797. Divisions occurred over Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton’s plans for the federal government to assume states’ debts, establish a national bank, raise taxes, and pursue a pro-British foreign policy. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, believing Hamilton’s proposals were unconstitutional, vehemently opposed the Hamiltonian program. Thought officially neutral, President Washington always seemed to side with Hamilton.
3. The age of democracy, 1816–44

3. The age of democracy, 1816–44  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
3. The age of democracy, 1816–44 In a single generation from 1816 to 1844, the United States underwent an economic, political, and social transformation. This market revolution occurred as a result of better transportation and communication systems. Canals, better roads, and new transportation via steamboats and railroads pushed farmers from subsistence agriculture to production for a vast national market. A communication revolution in print technology and the telegraph coincided with this transportation revolution. The development of a national postal system allowed widespread, easy distribution of newspapers. Handicraft industry increasingly gave way to factory production, especially in the textile and shoe
4. The politics of slavery: prelude to the Civil War, 1844–60

4. The politics of slavery: prelude to the Civil War, 1844–60  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
4. The politics of slavery: prelude to the Civil War, 1844–60 Moral absolutes and democratic politics are not easily reconciled. By its nature, politics is the practice of compromise, and for those given to moral absolutes, compromise means betrayal of principle. The issue of slavery in late antebellum politics reveals this gap in tragic proportions. For many southerners, owning slaves was a property right upheld by the Constitution. For northern abolitionists, slavery denied the principle that all men—including blacks—were endowed with natural rights of liberty and equality before God. Of course, God’s law was not easily determined by a majoritarian
5. Politics in war and Reconstruction, 1861–76

5. Politics in war and Reconstruction, 1861–76  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
5. Politics in war and Reconstruction, 1861–76 The Civil War and its aftermath intensified politics in the North, sharpening the divide between Republicans and Democrats and factionalizing the Republican Party. The war did not politically unite the North during the war. Abraham Lincoln confronted deep factionalism in his own party and a Democratic Party calling for peace with the rebel Confederates. Within his own party, Lincoln faced opposition from Radical Republicans who insisted upon emancipation of slaves and vengeance on the South. Conservative Republicans called for caution. These factional divisions worsened after Lincoln’s assassination in 1865, leading the Republican Congress
6. Gilded Age frustration and the Progressive response, 1877–1918

6. Gilded Age frustration and the Progressive response, 1877–1918  

Donald T. Critchlow

in American Political History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Dec 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2015
eISBN: 
9780199393725
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199340057.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199340057
6. Gilded Age frustration and the Progressive response, 1877–1918 Self-gain, partisan loyalty, and corruption characterized politics after the Civil War at a time when United States became the world’s leading industrial power. From 1877 through 1900, Americans—white males—participated in politics as never before. Voters divided generally along ethnic, religious, and sectional lines. Republicans controlled the White House during most of these years, while party control of Congress remained divided, with the Republicans usually holding the Senate and Democrats the House.
5. The Revolution in power (1914–1920)

5. The Revolution in power (1914–1920)  

Alan Knight

in The Mexican Revolution: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2016
Published Online: 
Jan 2016
eISBN: 
9780191807664
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198745631.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198745631
5. The Revolution in power (1914–1920) Personnel and policy The final defeat of Huerta and his army—thus, more consequentially, of the old regime which they fought to shore up—brought decisive changes. While the Madero revolt of 1910–11 had been halted in mid-course, the Constitutionalist revolution was a fight to the finish. ‘A Revolution which compromises is a lost Revolution,’ as Carranza pronounced; and he decreed that captured Federal Army officers should be summarily shot for treason, which they regularly were. The war polarized Mexican society and, by demanding heavy sacrifices, instilled an icy realpolitik into revolutionary practice: as winners, the

View: