You are looking at  1-6 of 6 items

  • Keywords: deforestation x
Clear All

View:

1. Forests in human culture

1. Forests in human culture  

Jaboury Ghazoul

in Forests: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2015
Published Online: 
May 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785306
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198706175.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198706175
1. Forests in human culture The tree which moves some to tears of joy is, in the eyes of others, only a green thing which stands in the way. ). Two years and eight days later she climbed back down again. Her two-year sojourn in the canopy was to protest the logging of ancient forest trees by the Pacific Lumber Company, and in doing so she became an unlikely hero of a national and global movement to protect forests. Julia Hill’s stand against Pacific Lumber encapsulates two polarized perceptions of forests, as resources ripe for exploitation or as pristine Nature,
6. Climate surprises

6. Climate surprises  

Mark Maslin

in Climate Change: A Very Short Introduction (3rd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Oct 2014
Published Online: 
Oct 2014
eISBN: 
9780191788376
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198719045.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198719045
6. Climate surprises shows the main tipping points which scientists have been concerned about over the last two decades. Irreversible melting of the Greenland and/or Western Antarctic ice sheet, slowing down of the North Atlantic deep ocean circulation, gas hydrates, and the Amazon rainforest dieback will all be discussed.
Forests: A Very Short Introduction

Forests: A Very Short Introduction  

Jaboury Ghazoul

Print Publication Year: 
May 2015
Published Online: 
May 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785306
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198706175.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780198706175
A Very Short Introduction
5. Centres of diversity

5. Centres of diversity  

Martin F. Price

in Mountains: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2015
Published Online: 
Sep 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782466
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199695881.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199695881
5. Centres of diversity Biodiversity hotspots endemic (species found in only one area) and 30 per cent or less of its original natural vegetation. While these hotspots cover only 2.3 per cent of the Earth’s land surface, they host a very high proportion of the world’s endemic species: 50 per cent of the world’s endemic plant species and 42 per cent of endemic bird, mammal, reptile, and amphibian species. Twenty-five of the hotspots are wholly or partly in mountainous areas, particularly in the tropics: from central Mexico to Argentina, through the mountains of
5. Environmental futures

5. Environmental futures  

Andrew Dobson

in Environmental Politics: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2016
Published Online: 
Jan 2016
eISBN: 
9780191781209
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199665570.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199665570
5. Environmental futures Fifty years ago, British Prime Minister Harold Wilson is supposed to have said that a week is a long time in politics. Right at the other end of the scale we find biologist Colin Tudge writing that, ‘we cannot claim to be taking our species and our planet seriously until we acknowledge that a million years is a proper unit of political time’. Wilson’s point was that politics is an unpredictable business; and Tudge’s is that environmental short-termism puts politics—and indeed everything else—at risk. Environmental politics has put the long term on the map: it focuses as
6. Past, present, and future

6. Past, present, and future  

Jaboury Ghazoul

in Forests: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2015
Published Online: 
May 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785306
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198706175.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198706175
6. Past, present, and future The past: a history of European deforestation Over forty years ago, Henry Darby, widely regarded as Britain’s first and best-known historical geographers, suggested that ‘the most important single factor that has changed the European landscape is the clearing of the woodland’. A human history of forests is largely one of deforestation, and is as old as human history itself. Hunter-gatherers leave fewer tangible marks on the environment compared to farmers, yet their effects on forests can still be substantial. Late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic people in Europe used stone axes to clear a little woodland around

View: