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6. Hearing the crime victim?

6. Hearing the crime victim?  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
6. Hearing the crime victim? Thirty years ago someone broke into my home late at night, stealing and damaging some property. Months passed after I had reported the crime to the police, I eventually went to give evidence at the trial of the man accused of the burglary. In fact, I went to court twice, only to be sent home on both occasions, having been told that the matter had been ‘put over’—delayed for some reason that was never explained to me. On the third visit, after passing hours in the waiting area, a prosecutor came over, said, ‘You can
9. Science and justice

9. Science and justice  

Jim Fraser

in Forensic Science: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2010
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777400
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199558056.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199558056
9. Science and justice
7. How do we control crime?

7. How do we control crime?  

Tim Newburn

in Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Apr 2018
Published Online: 
Apr 2018
eISBN: 
9780191785511
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199643257.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199643257
7. How do we control crime? In this chapter, I want to discuss both the formal and less formal means that might be thought to control crime. First is to consider formal means, by and large by using what we refer to as the criminal justice system. In saying this we must recognize, of course, that our penal system has many functions beyond controlling crime, not the least of which is administering justice irrespective of its impact on offending. Second, and arising from what we know to be the limitations of organized criminal justice in relation to crime control, I
7. Politics and justice

7. Politics and justice  

Simon Glendinning

in Derrida: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2011
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775796
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803450.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803450
7. Politics and justice
5. Morals, Politics, and Religion

5. Morals, Politics, and Religion  

A. J. Ayer

in Hume: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Oct 2000
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776601
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854063.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192854063
5. Morals, Politics, and Religion
4. Rights and justice

4. Rights and justice  

Raymond Wacks

in Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2014
eISBN: 
9780191779664
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199687008.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199687008
4. Rights and justice
9. Endings

9. Endings  

Poole Adrian

in Tragedy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2005
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775543
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192802354.003.0010
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192802354
9. Endings
5. Justice

5. Justice  

David Miller

in Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775895
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803955.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803955
5. Justice
2. Between the crime and the court

2. Between the crime and the court  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
2. Between the crime and the court After the commission of the crime and prior to the accused entering a plea, the case is in the hands of the police and the prosecution branches of criminal justice. Most countries operate a professional and independent prosecution service—known as the Crown Prosecution Service in England and Wales. Maintaining a separate prosecution service permits some distance and independence from the professionals gathering evidence, namely the police.
3. In court and on trial

3. In court and on trial  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
3. In court and on trial Once a trial date is set, the parties prepare for the hearing in court. They will make their respective cases before an objective adjudicator. There is considerable variation in terms of the nature of the decision-making body—whether it’s a judge and jury or simply a judge, for example—as well as the ways that the adjudicator is appointed.
5. Criminal law

5. Criminal law  

G. Edward White

in American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2013
Published Online: 
Dec 2013
eISBN: 
9780199375240
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199766000.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199766000
5. Criminal law
6. Feminism and multiculturalism

6. Feminism and multiculturalism  

David Miller

in Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775895
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803955.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803955
6. Feminism and multiculturalism
5. Ethics

5. Ethics  

Brad Inwood

in Stoicism: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2018
Published Online: 
Jul 2018
eISBN: 
9780191828973
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198786665.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198786665
5. Ethics Republic . Is justice valued and worth pursuing (a) because of the extrinsic benefits it produces; (b) because of the intrinsic benefits it produces; or (c) because of both? An Epicurean chooses option (a); Plato, Aristotle, and most other ancient theorists choose (c); Stoics choose (b). Not only is virtue its own reward, but any additional
6. Philosophical liberalism: idealizing justice

6. Philosophical liberalism: idealizing justice  

Michael Freeden

in Liberalism: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2015
Published Online: 
Jun 2015
eISBN: 
9780191783258
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199670437.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199670437
6. Philosophical liberalism: idealizing justice
1. In Good King Edward's golden days

1. In Good King Edward's golden days  

Nicholas Vincent

in Magna Carta: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2012
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777806
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199582877.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199582877
1. In Good King Edward's golden days Winnie the Pooh , King John was not a good man: ‘he had his little ways’. King John's ‘little ways’ have earned him a prominent place in the pantheon of infamy. It was to curb them that Magna Carta was first devised. From television explorations of ‘The Most Evil Men in History’, to Ridley Scott's Robin Hood , King John has generally been portrayed as the most gruesome of pantomime villains. His reputation for duplicity and worse is at least seven centuries old. Writing in the 1230s, the English chronicler
5. The constitutional peace

5. The constitutional peace  

Oliver P. Richmond

in Peace: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2014
Published Online: 
Nov 2014
eISBN: 
9780191788642
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199656004.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199656004
5. The constitutional peace Despite the apparent prevalence of the victor’s peace throughout history much of the historical record also points to the legitimacy of broader understandings of peace. The idea that peace could be constructed through law, institutions, rights, and prosperity, rather than enforced or merely preserved by military power, emerged slowly during and after the Enlightenment as an advance on the victor’s peace. This was partly in response to violent excesses of elite and state power, and partly to satisfy growing mobilization for a range of rights from within society.
Forensic Science: A Very Short Introduction

Forensic Science: A Very Short Introduction  

Jim Fraser

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2010
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777400
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199558056.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780199558056
A Very Short Introduction
1. Law’s roots

1. Law’s roots  

Raymond Wacks

in Law: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2015
Published Online: 
Sep 2015
eISBN: 
9780191807657
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198745624.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198745624
1. Law’s roots Board a bus. The law is there. You have almost certainly entered into a contract to pay the fare to your destination. Alight before you have paid, and the long arm of the criminal law may be expected to pursue you. The bus is involved in an accident. The law is ready to determine who is responsible for the injury you sustained.
1. Introducing criminal justice

1. Introducing criminal justice  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
1. Introducing criminal justice Society causes crime and creates offenders. Think of Robinson Crusoe on the island, but without his ‘Man Friday’. On a desert island there’s no-one from whom to steal, no-one to assault. No society, no laws, no crime, and no criminals. Once a society emerges, rules develop, and when they are broken society must respond—otherwise the rules would lose their potency to affect behaviour.
7. The future of criminal justice

7. The future of criminal justice  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
7. The future of criminal justice Predicting the direction of criminal justice is a perilous undertaking, although the evolution of criminal justice to date offers some clues to the future. A number of trends will continue. Western criminal justice is undergoing great transformation, in part because of the worldwide conditions of austerity created by the global economic recession of 2008−10. Western societies are committed to reducing the costs of public services, including criminal justice. Most likely this means more budget cuts, and more privatization.

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