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Navigation: A Very Short Introduction

Navigation: A Very Short Introduction  

Jim Bennett

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2017
Published Online: 
Feb 2017
eISBN: 
9780191798153
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198733713.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780198733713
A Very Short Introduction
3. Science and practice

3. Science and practice  

Frank A. J. L. James

in Michael Faraday: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2010
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777646
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199574315.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199574315
3. Science and practice
3. A mathematical science

3. A mathematical science  

Jim Bennett

in Navigation: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2017
Published Online: 
Feb 2017
eISBN: 
9780191798153
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198733713.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198733713
3. A mathematical science The science of finding latitude science . This is because its meaning and reference, as we understand them, became current only in the mid-19th century. William Whewell is credited with inventing the word scientist in 1833. The historian’s problem, then, is the discomfort of trying often to write the history of something that did not exist, at least nominally, for people at the time.
4. Dead reckoning, longitude, and time

4. Dead reckoning, longitude, and time  

Jim Bennett

in Navigation: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2017
Published Online: 
Feb 2017
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198733713.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
4. Dead reckoning, longitude, and time Latitude sailing and dead reckoning What was the state of the mathematical science of navigation at the end of the 17th century? Latitude could be found, weather permitting, using instruments adapted from astronomy and some basic geometry applied to an elementary knowledge of the heavens. A geometrical projection for charts accommodated to the needs of seamen was known, even if not always used, and the calculations it imposed on plotting positions and courses had been explained and made accessible through the design of new instruments. The vagaries of the magnetic compass were better appreciated,
5. The zenith of the mathematical seaman

5. The zenith of the mathematical seaman  

Jim Bennett

in Navigation: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2017
Published Online: 
Feb 2017
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198733713.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
5. The zenith of the mathematical seaman Chronometers, sextants, or both? deck watch and a pocket chronometer would become blurred. In fact what happened was that theorists and practitioners found other ways to combine chronometer and sextant. Position would still be stated as a latitude and a longitude but the two need not be found in separate and distinct operations.

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