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7. How much is systematic?

7. How much is systematic?  

P. H. Matthews

in Linguistics: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Apr 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775321
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192801487.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192801487
7. How much is systematic? Abstract To say that languages are systems is to draw a line around what we are studying. ‘How much is systematic?’ points out that a line drawn differently might include much that is less determinate. For instance, if differences in pitch or meaning cannot be reduced to exact contrasts, they are strictly not part of one's knowledge of the language as a system. Many linguists search for constraints that reveal the character of language, or of languages, in general. Therein lies the excitement of Chomsky's Universal Grammar. If he is right, it is reasonable to
8. Heidegger

8. Heidegger  

Andrew Bowie

in German Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2010
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191777561
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199569250.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199569250
8. Heidegger
8. What is possible?

8. What is possible?  

Stephen Mumford

in Metaphysics: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2012
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191778308
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199657124.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199657124
8. What is possible? Abstract ‘What is possible?’ looks at possibilities. Are they things? Do they have any kind of being? Or are they a mere fabrication: things we can think about but which are not really a part of the world? Two accounts are given: firstly, the possible worlds account where every possibility of our world is actual at some other world, meaning as many worlds as there are possibilities. The other is David Armstrong's Combinatorial Theory of Possibility: for something to be possible, it can suffice just that the particular and the property exist that would, if they
1. The Gap between Knowledge and Wisdom

1. The Gap between Knowledge and Wisdom  

Simon Critchley

in Continental Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776373
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853592.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853592
1. The Gap between Knowledge and Wisdom
5. Meat-eating

5. Meat-eating  

David DeGrazia

in Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776380
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853608.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853608
5. Meat-eating
2. Habermas's new approach to social theory

2. Habermas's new approach to social theory  

James Gordon Finlayson

in Habermas: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2005
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776274
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192840950.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192840950
2. Habermas's new approach to social theory
3. The pragmatic meaning programme

3. The pragmatic meaning programme  

James Gordon Finlayson

in Habermas: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
May 2005
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776274
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192840950.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192840950
3. The pragmatic meaning programme
8. Transcendental philosophy

8. Transcendental philosophy  

Roger Scruton

in Kant: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775482
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192801999.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192801999
8. Transcendental philosophy Abstract Kant's immediate successors regarded Kant as having changed the course of philosophy. However, even during his lifetime, the intellectual world was torn by controversy over the meaning of his critical system. ‘Transcendental philosophy’ examines what Kant's contemporaries and later commentators took from his thoughts and how they analysed what he said. Was he really a Leibnizian? If the transcendental philosophy is not a version of Leibnizian rationalism, why is it not instead a repetition of the sceptical empiricism of Hume? Neither the Leibnizian nor the Humean interpretation is tenable. Kant's true critical philosophy can be assimilated
1. The study of language

1. The study of language  

P. H. Matthews

in Linguistics: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Apr 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775321
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192801487.003.0001
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192801487
1. The study of language Abstract ‘The study of language’ argues that studying language ‘scientifically’ is, in part, to refuse to accept uncritically the ways of thinking that, without any professional training, we all bring to it. We must strive to be as objective as possible, both about individual languages and the nature of language in general. Linguistics straddles the institutional rift between arts and sciences. It clearly has its ‘arts’ side, and links with other subjects in the humanities. It also has links with the ‘social’ sciences, especially sociology and anthropology. Yet it has its ‘science’ side too, particularly
TranslationA Very Short Introduction

Translation: A Very Short Introduction  

Matthew Reynolds

Print Publication Year: 
Oct 2016
Published Online: 
Oct 2016
eISBN: 
9780191780622
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198712114.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780198712114
A Very Short Introduction

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