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2. The moral status of animals

2. The moral status of animals  

David DeGrazia

in Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2002
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776380
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192853608.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192853608
2. The moral status of animals
6. Child abuse

6. Child abuse  

Jonathan Herring

in Family Law: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2014
eISBN: 
9780191779657
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199668526.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199668526
6. Child abuse
8. Is medical research the new imperialism?

8. Is medical research the new imperialism?  

Tony Hope

in Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2004
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775680
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192802828.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192802828
8. Is medical research the new imperialism?
4. Rights and justice

4. Rights and justice  

Raymond Wacks

in Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2014
Published Online: 
Feb 2014
eISBN: 
9780191779664
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199687008.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199687008
4. Rights and justice
5. Data protection

5. Data protection  

Raymond Wacks

in Privacy: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2015
Published Online: 
Mar 2015
eISBN: 
9780191792915
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198725947.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198725947
5. Data protection Information is no longer merely power. It is big business. In recent years the fastest growing component of international trade has been the service sector. It accounts for more than a third of world trade—and it continues to expand. It is a commonplace to identify as a central feature of modern industrialized societies their dependence on the storage of information. The use of computers facilitates, of course, considerably greater efficiency and velocity in the collection, storage, use, retrieval, and transfer of information.
3. Human rights foreign policy and the role of the United Nations

3. Human rights foreign policy and the role of the United Nations  

Andrew Clapham

in Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2015
Published Online: 
Nov 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785436
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198706168.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198706168
3. Human rights foreign policy and the role of the United Nations The narrative about agreed texts and their international supervision leaves many dissatisfied. Where is the enforcement of these rights? We have a legal framework and reports from international secretariats and non-governmental organizations, but where is the pressure to ensure that these rights are realized in practice? What does it really mean when governments say that their foreign policy is concerned with promoting and protecting human rights? Only very rarely do governments actually invoke these treaties before international courts in order to bring international complaints against other states. Clearly
8. Discrimination and equality

8. Discrimination and equality  

Andrew Clapham

in Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Nov 2015
Published Online: 
Nov 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785436
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198706168.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198706168
8. Discrimination and equality As we have seen throughout this short book, discrimination is prohibited with regard to the enjoyment of all rights. We have discovered the immediate obligation to prevent discrimination, not only in the context of the enjoyment of civil and political rights (such as personal freedom from arbitrary detention, freedom of expression, political participation, and association), but also in the fields of food, water, health, education, housing, and work. Now we shall consider the prohibited grounds of discrimination, what new grounds may be emerging, and when drawing distinctions between people can be considered reasonable and therefore legitimate.
4. Freedom and the limits of government

4. Freedom and the limits of government  

David Miller

in Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jun 2003
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191775895
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192803955.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192803955
4. Freedom and the limits of government
5. In and out of prison

5. In and out of prison  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
5. In and out of prison The use of the prison has evolved considerably over the centuries. In the late Middle Ages imprisonment was just a way of ensuring that the offender paid a fine—he left prison as soon as he had paid the fine. Today, we seldom imprison people for failure to pay a fine; prisons are all about punishment and rehabilitation, but particularly punishment. The state of prisons today The cell was eight feet by eight feet, filthy and with the straw worn to dust and swarming with vermin. There was no accessible water and the offenders were
6. Hearing the crime victim?

6. Hearing the crime victim?  

Julian V. Roberts

in Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191785092
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780198716495.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780198716495
6. Hearing the crime victim? Thirty years ago someone broke into my home late at night, stealing and damaging some property. Months passed after I had reported the crime to the police, I eventually went to give evidence at the trial of the man accused of the burglary. In fact, I went to court twice, only to be sent home on both occasions, having been told that the matter had been ‘put over’—delayed for some reason that was never explained to me. On the third visit, after passing hours in the waiting area, a prosecutor came over, said, ‘You can

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