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p. 1147. Racist identities: ambivalence, contradiction, and commitmentlocked

  • Ali Rattansi

Abstract

People are often accused of using racialized language but this is not the same as being called a racist. What constitutes an identity? An individual or group identity is only partly a matter of self-identification. Identities are also assigned by others. They imply and rely on the recognition of differences. ‘Racist identities: ambivalence, contradiction, and commitment’ questions the ambivalence of racialized language, the factors that create an identity, and the contradictions involved in anti-racists claims that prejudice is a product of ignorance and irrationality. Having a possibly unfavourable view of ‘outsiders’ does not constitute racism, which involves specific beliefs about the existence of race and the possibility of a hierarchical order.

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