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p. 1048. Freedom and its place in naturelocked

  • Thomas Pink

Abstract

‘Freedom and its place in nature’ assesses the randomness problem. According to scepticism, there is no middle ground between predeterminism and uncontrollable randomness. Libertarianism posits that events can be causally undetermined but still controlled. Thus, freedom is a power to determine events — a special kind of causal power. However, this reduction of freedom to a special case of causal power cannot explain how we can decide to frustrate our desires. Libertarians see freedom as the vehicle for the exercise of freedom, not as an effect of it. Libertarianly free action must be causally undetermined, but it is more than random chance. Scepticism has no convincing argument against libertarian freedom.

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