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p. 748. Military lawyeringlocked

  • Eugene R. Fidell

Abstract

‘Military lawyering’ shows that increasingly, national military justice systems look much like civilian criminal trials with military or civilian lawyers acting as judges and other lawyers prosecuting and defending. In the United States, most military lawyering is done by lawyers who are commissioned officers, organized in many national systems into a Judge Advocate General’s Corps, department, or branch. In addition, civilian lawyers may play a role, either as military judges in some systems, or as defense counsel retained by the accused. The different judiciary roles are outlined along with potential problem areas. In the United States, each branch of the armed forces maintains a professional responsibility program and has regulations governing the conduct of counsel.

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