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3. Exploring the past

3. Exploring the past  

Anthony Storr

in Freud: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776793
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854551.003.0003
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192854551
3. Exploring the past Infantile sexual development Freud's rejection of the seduction theory did not shake his conviction that neurosis was connected with disturbances of the sexual function, nor his belief that neurosis originated in the earliest years of childhood. But instead of continuing to concentrate his attention upon traumatic incidents, he turned to studying the sexual and emotional development of children, and advanced the idea that neurosis in later life came about because the child's sexual development had been partly arrested at some immature stage. As he himself put it: A formula begins to take shape which lays
5. Analytic space, time, and technique

5. Analytic space, time, and technique  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0005
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
5. Analytic space, time, and technique A single consultation or few meetings can be valuable, and might even shed helpful new light on a patient’s Oedipal or other neurotic problems, but the talking cure typically involves treatment over months, or more likely years, and does not promise change through an epiphany. A patient may have spent years building defences against areas of anxiety and psychic pain; getting past them is not the work of a day. To facilitate analysis, Freud proposed a fixed duration (the session) and a reliable, regular location (the consulting room) ensuring privacy. This chapter explores features
Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction  

Daniel Pick

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780199226818
Psychoanalysis A Very Short Introduction
9. Culture and religion

9. Culture and religion  

Anthony Storr

in Freud: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776793
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854551.003.0009
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192854551
9. Culture and religion
6. War, politics, and ideas

6. War, politics, and ideas  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
6. War, politics, and ideas The debates about technique described in evolved over decades and owed much to a second generation of clinicians who came to prominence between the 1920s and 1950s. Before considering more closely in the work of some key figures in that second wave, who have only been mentioned in passing so far, it is important to set the scene and recall the fraught historical context in which psychoanalysis developed. This chapter sketches Freud’s later ideas and refers to broader political circumstances prevailing between 1914 and 1945. Analytic ideas
4. Oedipus

4. Oedipus  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
4. Oedipus Ever since Freud formulated the Oedipus complex, wrote the analyst Hanna Segal, ‘it has been recognized as the central conflict in the human psyche—the central cluster of conflicting impulses, phantasies, anxieties and defences. It has therefore become the centre of psychoanalytic work.’ It is indeed a pivotal idea in psychoanalysis, and one that has also been the source of withering criticisms. Freud’s ideas about Oedipus garnered enormous cultural interest and admiration too; for many it became an organizing model and a key to self-revelation. When Woody Allen created a sketch, ‘Oedipus wrecks’, for the movie New York
Freud: A Very Short Introduction

Freud: A Very Short Introduction  

Anthony Storr

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776793
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854551.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780192854551
A Very Short Introduction
6. Aggression, depression, and paranoia

6. Aggression, depression, and paranoia  

Anthony Storr

in Freud: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2001
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191776793
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780192854551.003.0006
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192854551
6. Aggression, depression, and paranoia
8. Identity, identification, and the subject

8. Identity, identification, and the subject  

Jonathan Culler

in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (2nd edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2011
Published Online: 
Sep 2013
eISBN: 
9780191778384
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199691340.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199691340
8. Identity, identification, and the subject
2. Freud and psychoanalysis

2. Freud and psychoanalysis  

Tom Burns and Eva Burns‐Lundgren

in Psychotherapy: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2015
Published Online: 
Jan 2015
eISBN: 
9780191781599
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199689361.003.0002
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199689361
2. Freud and psychoanalysis
7. Further innovations and controversies

7. Further innovations and controversies  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
7. Further innovations and controversies In an interview in 1990, Laplanche protested against the ‘social adaptation of the profession’. He sharply criticized those seeking to impose upon analysis ‘any pre-established social aim’, arguing that the treatment ‘is purely a personal question’. He rejected the distinction between clinical and theoretical matters, questioning the privileged category of training analysts (those selected by their organizations in order to analyse would-be analysts), and any assumption that the field itself belongs to the formal analytical societies anyway. ‘This is very radical’, murmured his interviewer. Yes, said Laplanche, adding that he expected such radicalism to be

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