You are looking at  1-3 of 3 items

  • Keywords: primal scene x
Clear All

View:

Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction  

Daniel Pick

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.001.0001
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780199226818
Psychoanalysis A Very Short Introduction
4. Oedipus

4. Oedipus  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0004
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
4. Oedipus Ever since Freud formulated the Oedipus complex, wrote the analyst Hanna Segal, ‘it has been recognized as the central conflict in the human psyche—the central cluster of conflicting impulses, phantasies, anxieties and defences. It has therefore become the centre of psychoanalytic work.’ It is indeed a pivotal idea in psychoanalysis, and one that has also been the source of withering criticisms. Freud’s ideas about Oedipus garnered enormous cultural interest and admiration too; for many it became an organizing model and a key to self-revelation. When Woody Allen created a sketch, ‘Oedipus wrecks’, for the movie New York
7. Further innovations and controversies

7. Further innovations and controversies  

Daniel Pick

in Psychoanalysis: A Very Short Introduction

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780191782404
DOI: 
10.1093/actrade/9780199226818.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199226818
7. Further innovations and controversies In an interview in 1990, Laplanche protested against the ‘social adaptation of the profession’. He sharply criticized those seeking to impose upon analysis ‘any pre-established social aim’, arguing that the treatment ‘is purely a personal question’. He rejected the distinction between clinical and theoretical matters, questioning the privileged category of training analysts (those selected by their organizations in order to analyse would-be analysts), and any assumption that the field itself belongs to the formal analytical societies anyway. ‘This is very radical’, murmured his interviewer. Yes, said Laplanche, adding that he expected such radicalism to be

View: