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p. 879. The partisan revivallocked

  • Richard M. Valelly

Abstract

Political historians devised the term “party period” for the nineteenth-century heyday of American political parties, from roughly 1840 to 1900. ‘The partisan revival’ argues that the United States is in a second party period, with increased party loyalty among voters and their noticeable movement into opposing ideological camps. Today, though, the partisan revival is rebuilding the American nation. Political parties and the elective offices that they populate are today much more diverse, with the long civil rights struggles of the twentieth century eventually bringing African Americans and Latinos into the halls of Congress and state legislatures — and into the White House.

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