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date: 21 June 2021

p. 414. Post-Revolutionary philosophy

the 19th century and the Third Republiclocked

p. 414. Post-Revolutionary philosophy

the 19th century and the Third Republiclocked

  • Stephen Gaukroger
  •  and Knox Peden

Abstract

After the French Revolution, philosophy and the rapid rise of individualism were blamed for the bloodshed. ‘Post-Revolutionary philosophy: the nineteenth century and the Third Republic’ introduces thinkers like Auguste Comte, who ushered in socialism by arguing that Enlightenment ideas had toppled the old order of monarchy and religion, but that their individualism potentially hampered progress. Progress, epitomized by science, was the goal in nineteenth-century French philosophy. Rationalism and the ‘critical idealism’ of Léon Brunschvicg were not the only schools of thought. The Romantic philosopher Henri Bergson tackled the relationship between mind, body, and spirit by defining knowledge as a process.

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